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A glorious eruption of vibrantly-colored flower petals – 8 million of them – has flooded through a small village in Costa Rica. The surreal and beautiful sight is part of SONY’s advertisement campaign for their new 4K Ultra HD line of TV sets.

Perhaps the most surprising thing about this advertisement stunt is that these billowing waves of petals are real. It took the creative team behind the endeavor and the inhabitants of the village more than two weeks to collect the 8 million flower petals used, which ended up weighing about 3.5 tons.

A British special effects team brought various wind machines to blow the petals around and create the amazing sights in the video. Some visual effects were added, but director Jaron Albertin assures us that as much of the video as possible is real. Sony’s behind-the-scenes video also indicates that all of the petals were either real or from some biodegradable material. The video was commissioned by the McCann advertising agency, and photographer Nick Meek shot photos of the whole affair.

The reason the video uses 8 million flower petals is because that’s the number of pixels on the 4K TV’s screen. The video will be used to demonstrate this new ultra-high-definition screen’s sharp display and color capabilities.

(Source: sony.co.uk)

Filed under explosion petals flowers colour vibrant advertisement stunt surprise billowing waves real creative 8 million weighing collect red purple costa rica surreal beautiful sight SONY 4K Ultra HD TV television special effects wing

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REFLECT - Part 2

In early 2013, commercial photographer Trent Bell was shocked by the news that a friend - an educated professional, a husband, and a father of four children - had been sentenced to thirty-six years in prison. Over the proceeding months, Bell found himself haunted by not only his friend’s bad decisions and loss of freedom, but also moments in his own life when things could have easily taken a bad turn.

"There were times when my son would look up and smile at me," recalls Bell, "and the finality of my friend’s situation would rush into my head and I would hear a cold thin voice say: ‘…there, but for the grace of God, go I…’"

Bell, who is known for his architectural photography in publications such as the Conde Nast Traveler, Design New England, and the New York Times, soon conceived of a photo project that would merge large-scale portraits of inmates in the Maine prison system with handwritten letters the convicts composed as though writing to their younger selves.

"Our bad choices can contain untold loss, remorse, and regret." says Bell, ‘but the positive value of these bad choices might be immeasurable if we can face them, admit to them, learn from them and find the strength to share."

Filed under trent bell photograph prison jail inmates life family freedom loss mother daughter father son children reflect regret remorse prisoners sorry apologise past present future choices sentenced 36 years bad negative younger

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REFLECT - Part 1

In early 2013, commercial photographer Trent Bell was shocked by the news that a friend - an educated professional, a husband, and a father of four children - had been sentenced to thirty-six years in prison. Over the proceeding months, Bell found himself haunted by not only his friend’s bad decisions and loss of freedom, but also moments in his own life when things could have easily taken a bad turn.

"There were times when my son would look up and smile at me," recalls Bell, "and the finality of my friend’s situation would rush into my head and I would hear a cold thin voice say: ‘…there, but for the grace of God, go I…’"

Bell, who is known for his architectural photography in publications such as the Conde Nast Traveler, Design New England, and the New York Times, soon conceived of a photo project that would merge large-scale portraits of inmates in the Maine prison system with handwritten letters the convicts composed as though writing to their younger selves.

"Our bad choices can contain untold loss, remorse, and regret." says Bell, ‘but the positive value of these bad choices might be immeasurable if we can face them, admit to them, learn from them and find the strength to share."

(Source: trentbell.com)

Filed under trent ball photographer prisoners remorse guilt family loss choices jail life freedom sentenced 36 years husband father children mother bad negative REFLECT younger older present past letters

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Artist Irons And Folds Tulle Fabric To Create Beautiful Portraits

In the hands of British artist Benjamin Shine, a piece of tulle isn’t just for making fancy dresses and curtains – it becomes a great material for creating amazing realistic “paintings.”

Using an iron, Shine sculpts, presses and pleats the huge single piece of tulle, whose transparent qualities give the portrait more texture and depth. By layering in this way, the artist obtains different tones and shadows that enable him to realistically portray iconic stars like Elizabeth Taylor, elegant abstract faces and other things, such as a pair of elderly hands.

“The idea of ‘painting with fabric’ led to the development of this technique where the portrait image is created through the intricate pleating and pressing of a single length of tulle fabric. The technique aims to utilize the translucent qualities of the tulle fabric to generate various gradients, tones and textures,” - Shine said of his works of art.

(Source: benjaminshine.com)

Filed under artist art iron ironing board heat steam folds tulle material fabric create beautiful portraits british benjamin shine dress curtain amazing paintings sculpts presses pleats tones shadows colours elizabeth taylor abstract face hands

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What Would The Ingredient List For A Natural Product Look Like?

Australian chemistry teacher James Kennedy has created a tongue-in-cheek set of images that take a fresh perspective on the public discussion about fresh and organic foods vs. the genetically modified products and chemical pesticides being championed by companies like Monsanto. His posters take all-natural products and break them down by their chemical composition, or their “ingredients.”

When we read the ingredient labels on the processed foods that we eat (or choose not to eat), there’s usually a long and worrisome list of chemical ingredients that we can’t identify. However, Kennedy’s series of images points out that our fear of some of these chemicals might be misplaced.

“I want to erode the fear that many people have of ‘chemicals’, and demonstrate that nature evolves compounds, mechanisms and structures far more complicated and unpredictable than anything we can produce in the lab,” writes Kennedy, who personally avoids buying any sort of food with monosodium glutamate (MSG) or high-fructose corn syrup.

“This poster series breaks down all the major ingredients in popular natural foods—using E-numbers and IUPAC [International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry] names instead of common names where they exist. Anthocynanins, for example, which are said to give blueberries their ‘superfood’ status, are also known as E163,” he explained.

Filed under ingredient list natural product healthy fruit health banana blueberries egg protein passionfruit chemicals teacher australian james kennedy all-natural unique creative yellow blue

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Artist Turns Dance Moves Into Beautiful Charcoal Drawings

Heather Hansen, a contemporary performance artist and dancer in New Orleans, has come up with an elegant and creative way to capture her dancing motions on paper – she gets up-close and personal with a big piece of paper and some charcoal.

For the performance aspect of her work, Hansen invites observers to watch her dance on a huge piece of paper. As she dances and prostates herself on the piece of paper, she marks it with charcoal, gradually building a beautiful diagram of her seemingly ritual dance. She has also created a video called “Emptied Gestures” that features studio recordings of her graceful and dramatic work for those that cannot see it live.

Hansen says of her work; Emptying Gestures is an experiment in kinetic drawing. In this series, I am searching for ways to download my movement directly onto paper, emptying gestures from one form to another and creating something new in the process”

Hansen is a very prolific artist. In addition to numerous gallery performances and exhibitions of her dance drawings, she also spent all of 2013 creating an artistic sketch a day and plans to do so 2014 as well. By the way – forcing yourself to create one piece of artwork a day is a great way for people to stay creatively occupied and motivated!

(Source: heatherhansen.net)

Filed under paint art paper large black white dance gestures work heather hansen elegant creative capture dancing motions artist unique drawings charcoal amazing beautiful spin curve

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This Is How Sand Looks Magnified Up To 300 Times

Comparing something to a grain of sand is usually supposed to mean that it’s small or insignificant, but Dr. Gary Greenberg’s microscopic photography aims to turn this stereotype on its head. His photographs of miniscule grains of sands magnified up to 300 times reveal that each grain of sand can be beautiful and unique.

Greenberg’s story is a fascinating one. First of all, he invented the high-definition 3D microscopes that he takes his pictures on, resulting in 18 U.S. patents under his name. He was a photographer and filmmaker until age 33, when he moved from LA to London and earned a Ph. D. in biomedical research. This seems to have given him a unique appreciation for biological and scientific curiosities and for the optical technologies he would need to document them.

Sand composition can vary drastically depending on where it’s located. The coastal sands in Hawaii, where Dr. Greenberg is located, are very likely the subjects of his amazing micro-photography. The sand in his images is full of remnants from various tropical sea organisms large and small. The sand on other coasts, depending on the temperature, surf conditions and marine environment, may include a totally different set of rocks, minerals and organic matter.

(Source: sandgrains.com)

Filed under sand magnified 300 beach art shells grains beautiful unique microscope picture photographer photograph special biological water waves yellow coastal hawaii tropical sea ocean organisms large small temperature minerals rocks shapes

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More incredible sculptures made of buttons

Incredible 3D Sculptures made of Sewing Buttons

Miami-based artist Augusto Esquivel creates incredible sculptures from thousands and thousands of sewing buttons. The artist carefully places these newly found tiny multi-colored art materials on a fishing line and builds magnificent artworks. Esquivel has already made quite a few of them, including a piano, a harp, a gramophone, a fire extinguisher and many more.

Augusto says that a simple sewing button may seem insignificant and small when it lays in a grandma’s sewing box, but at the same time it can be very unique and valuable as a part of an artwork. Augusto’s work can be compared to the molecule’s structure- like small atoms, buttons come together in unity and create brilliant art pieces.

Filed under buttons art sewing artist artwork creative unique create special cool fun colours candy coke tyre swing duck mirror dispenser tree cloud shower fishing

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This Is What Happens When You Blow Soap Bubbles at -9°C (15,8°F)

When the weather forecast announced about the unexpected cold from -9°C to -12°C last week, Washington-based photographer Angela Kelly decided to take an advantage of it in one truly creative way. Together with her 7-year-old son, Kelly combined the home-based remedies – dish soap, karo syrup, and water – and went out to blow bubbles and take pictures as they freeze and melt.

Soon the two adventurers found themselves in awe while watching the frost create magical patterns in the freezing bubbles. The smaller ones would freeze momentarily, simply mid-air, and then they would fall down and scatter like thin glass chips. The bigger ones would manage to freeze more slowly on the surface, giving the photographer a chance to catch the artworks of the frost on camera.

“We noted how they would freeze completely before the sun rose but that once the sun was in view they would defrost along the tops or cease freezing altogether.“ recalls Kelly to the KOMO News. “We also noted how they would begin to deflate and implode in on themselves making them look like alien shapes or in some cases shatter completely leaving them to look like a cracked egg.”

The process and the results of the photoshoot were highly rewarding for the photographer and her little one. “Are we ever too old to play with bubbles?” Kelly asks rhetoricaly. “I really think that this is the most fun, unique and beautiful series I’ve done yet!”

(Source: kellyimagesandphotography.webs.com)

Filed under weather snow forecast soap bubbles blow water syrup freeze melt amazing fun winter seasons summar air fall down scattor glass chips thin surface photograh photography sun cold freezing snowflake beautiful